手机网上捕鱼

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作者:Mckay

AG永久入口💰【ag88.shop】💰手机网上捕鱼】Javi\er Bar\dem t【akes over Times Square\ 【to demand ocean protections/A】ngela Me【rk\el wants\】 Germany to aim to \n\eutrali/se gas e【missions by 2050Text si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom lifeDub】ai acts to ste【m the 】ti【de of single use plastic【9;M/onster fa】tberg',\ bi【gger than the 【Tower of Pis】a, discov/【ered in D】evon /\Is o\ne week en\ough?【 0 m【edia outle\【ts【 dedicate \】news to climate 】changeText sizeAa\Aa【A vegan who&rsqu\o】;s passionate about】 zer/o-waste a】n/d/【 minimising the am/ount】 o/f harmful mate\】rials she consumes, such as /pla\stic and palm oil, Shia Su is a force for c【【\hange. Her In【stagram account, @_wastelandreb【e【l_ i/s a one-stop-shop for al】/l th【ings plan【t based, off】ering practical】 tips and useful /tri\cks fo【r making life more sustainable and eco-friend\ly. W【e caugh/t up with 【he\r \t【o find out more a】bout w\here \h【er \p】assion \comes from and w\【ha/t \she hopes t/o a【chieve【 with her inst【agram acc\o\unt.What inspired you \t】o sta】rt your Instagram a/cco【unt【?&/ldquo】;】I have been bloggin【g for eight years. /As a】 blogger, having social m/edia accounts/ lin【ked t【【o the 【bl【og was something \that just made 】se】nse.&rdqu【o;How has your relati【onship with sustainable food evolved ov】e【r 【time?&ldqu【o;I st】arted out as a food blo】gg】er in 2/011, d【eveloping and \sharing r\ecipes for cakes, cook】ie/s, /and desse】\rts. As y【ou can t//ell, \I&【rsquo;】\ve got the\ biggest sweet tooth! However,【 cook\ing has always been more of a necessary evil【 - so/mething an【noy/ing th【at had to be done.【 Unfortunately, even though he finds doing chores ca】l/m/in/g a【nd relaxing,】 my p\artner\ \still【 shares my lack o\f passion for ever【y/\d【ay food 】preparation. However, when we started to\ /reduce /o】ur trash we 【tur【ned to unprocessed】 food \as it is \ea/s/y to buy pack/age【-free. 】We】 were su/ddenly faced wi/th the see】mingly enormou】s task of learnin【g\ how to prepare food&】md】ash;from【 scr\atch!/ It 【was a cha/llenge at firs\/】t】, b/ut one that was wo\rth】 i/t. At the farmers’【 marke【t we】’d ask the farmers how to prepare vegetables【 /that 【we had never seen before. They also told us how\【 th/ey g\rew cert【ain thi】ngs. We have also bee\n able\ to go to farms to see all of it first hand【, so we now hav/e /a ve【ry【 di【fferent apprecia\tion for food.” Voir cette \pu\blication sur I/nstagramU/ne publication partag&eacut】e;e par Shia S【】【u, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd (@_was【tela/ndrebel_【) le 14 /Avril 2019 &a\grave; 9 :07 PDT Voir \cette publication 】sur \In【stagramUn】】】】e publication partagée par Shia Su, Ve\gan【 Zero Wast【e Nerd (\@_wastelandrebe/l_) 【】le 5 Mars 2019 à 11 】:20 PSTHave \y/ou always 【followed a s【ustainable diet?“Not at all! E【verything s\ugar】 was wha【t I was i\nto! And because none of us u【sed t】o enjoy co】oking, we lived /off proces/sed con/venience food a\nd tak\e out】. Thinki\ng bac【k now, I wonder 【how my body man/age】d to handle】 m\e \throwing all that junk \at it&helli【p;&rdqu/o;Ho】w can pe】ople ensur【e the food they bu【y/】 】is sustainably】 】made and sourced?“Download a ca【lendar th/at tells you what /is in sea】son w】here you live. Check it and b】uy at markets i\f you can.】 S\pea\king 【directly to the growers /means you can\ as】k 】th】em how long t】hey 】will 】【still 【be able t\o har/ve/st\ (and sell) this or that, and the【y can give you tips on how/ to f/ermen】t thi【ngs o\r /】ev】en share a quick recipe/】.”“/Some \st\a】ll\s w\ill o】nly/ be rese\lle【rs, b/ut some wil/l\ be th】e 】【farmers the/mselves. Ask t】hem w】here th【eir f】arm\ is and if you/ can /visit. \/Most farmers【 are more than h\appy to welcome】 y】ou - theyalways like it】 when\ people/ show【 genuine 【interest and appre\ciatio】n! Howeve/r, if a farmer /say//s no, \that’s a red fl】ag. What do they have to hide?\ If you see stickers on produc】e w【ith the\ name of another farm, or boxes with\ other name\s, it’s an indicator t\he pro\duce migh/t not be locall\y gro\wn. If【 you ask the farmer and th/e】y deny i\t,【 that’s another red flag. Kee\p in mind these ar】e exceptions.” \Voir cette\ publi【cation sur InstagramUne publication par/tag&\eacute;e【 par Shia Su, Vegan \Zero Waste Nerd (\@/_wast】elandrebe/l_) le 2 Mar/s 2019 à 5 :00 PST Voir cette public\ation sur Ins】ta\gramUne publication part/ag&ea/cut/e\;e 【pa】【r Shia Su, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd (\@_wastelandrebel_) le 21 F&eacu\te;【vr. 2019】 \/\à 6 :51\ PSTWha\t are the biggest problem areas in f】oo【d consumptio【n at the 】mome/nt when it\ come/s t【o sustainabil】ity?“Glob/【ally, abou】t a third of the food we gro\w is wasted. Fo\od has /bec】ome so aff【ordable in p/r【【【oport\ion\ to the income, compared to a f【ew d\e/cades ago. Easy】\ c【\ome, easy \g【o. We have/ also los】t sight of ho】w f】ood is grown and 】s】o m/uch effort goes into this whol\e process, because we can \just go【 to th】e next grocery store to get】 it. 【We also h【ave th【is mindset w\here we want a】ccess to anything anytime.【 We compl/etely disregard\ th\e fact that there are seasons, or that【 som\e】 【fr/uits simply【 do not gr【【ow locally. So our food supply /chai】n now spans across the globe, and our /fo【od travels【 farther than we\ /do【 ourselves. The longer the supply chain, howeve/r, the【 more is 】wasted,\ and the /mo\re packaging is needed to 【pro】tect the c\argo【.\ /T【his me】ans more plastic wa\st】e, too.&r【dquo;How【 w\ould/ you describ【e/ your photography aesthetic? What are y/ou hoping to inspire【?&ldquo\;To be honest, I/ think my photography i\s a bi】t all over the place at the moment. My life has/ been tur【ned ups【ide【 down last year,【】 and my photograp】hy reflects that. Regardless, what \is important to me \is to ad\d value to my followers life. Rig\ht now m【y photos might no\t 】reflect the calm, more minima【list and clean【 a】est\h】etic I’d like them/ 【to, but my posts are full of【 hands-on zero w/as【te tips and infor/mation.”What ti/ps\ can you offer people for r/educing thei】r food wa\s【te?“Buy less】 t】han 】what you fee\l you should buy. We hav【e the tendency 】to b\u【y too much, /encoura\g\ed 】b】y fr/idges【 that could house an\ ele【phant 】and pantries a【 family \c】ould sleep 】in//. If】 you’re the planner type—make a/ meal pl】an, shopping lists, and stick to them!】” Voir cett【e publication sur Instagram\Une pu/blication partag&ea【cute;e par】 S/hia Su, Vegan Zero Wa\s/t/e Nerd (\@【_wa【ste【la\ndrebel_) le 23 \Janv\.\ 2019 à 8 :45 PST Voir cette 】【p【ublication sur InstagramUne publication partag【ée par Shia/ Su, Vegan Zero Wa【ste【 Nerd (@/_was【】telandr】ebe\l_) le 1 Ma/i 20 à 12 :08 PDTWhen did you start working in sus\ta\inable eating and what was th【e 】c】/atalyst fo/r d】oing this?“All the amazing, in\spiring peopl【e I/ ha【ve/ met along the way 【were the ones tha】t kept me /going. Even th【ough I\ disliked cook【ing, talki【ng to\ \the farmers and following many amazin【g sustainable fo【od bloggers like Sara /from @shisodelicio/\u/s or C【】hristi】ne 】from @】co【/n】scious_c【/ooking made me want to try r【ecipes. They spiked my curios/ity for 【food and inspired 【me to venture into/ fermenting. Who wou】ld ha/【v/e thought I【&rsquo【;d】 go】】 f【rom fr【oz/】en【【 p/\izza girl to ferme【ntation-crazed lady?&\rdquo;Can you tell \me a little mor/e about【 your book?&\ldquo;I wro】te this book with t【】he v】oic/e of one my best friends since high school in mind. She is a career woma\n with 【a busy】 schedule a】n\d a/ long com】mute. She always said she’d【 love to have a more s/】us】tainable lif【estyle but /simply lacks the time to do 【the 【research a】nd to DIY \everything. Besides, she prefers to spend】 the little free t】\ime she has with her family and he】r husband】. And I get it—who&rs】quo;s got the time, re【【ally?” Voi/r ce/tte publication sur Instagra/mUne 【publication partagé【e par Shia S\u, Vegan Zero Waste Nerd\ (@_w【【a】stelandrebel_) le 6 Mars 2019 \&】agrave; 2 :45 PST“She wanted a preferably skim-\ab】le gui】de w】ith sim【ple hacks 】that she【 didn’t ha【v【e to/ read 】cove】r to cover. So I\ cam/e up with the /very visual【 beginner-friendly cookbook-lik【\e c/oncept. It【 h【elps you /get int】【o/ the ri【g/ht m】indset and provides background information, much like t\he i】ntroductory 】sec/\tion of\ c\ookbooks explaini】ng the particularities of a c【uisine. There is also a c/hapter on ze\ro waste /helpers s【o you kn【ow wha\t【 e/】quipment will \be h/elpful fo/r your ze【ro waste endeavo】urs. It&rsqu】o;s helpful【】 and very practica】l information, but if you do/n\&rsqu/o;t have t【he e【nergy to 【deal \with it, that’\s fin【e t/oo! Yo/u can ju\st jump to whatev/er 【you feel is man】ag【eable【 for 】you at the mome】nt, o/r whatever you/ feel drawn】 】to w\hen f/lipping thro【ugh】 the pages, a【nd try o【ne or two e\asy swaps or a one-mi【nut【e】【 recipe.&\rdquo;S【hia Su&rsq】uo;s Zero Wa】ste Book is 【out no【w and avai/lable here.Share this article\ More fro】m well/ness,见下图

Text sizeAaAaJames Bo/nd actor】 J\avier Bardem has tak\】e/n to t【he streets of New York’s Tim】es Square【 to demand gre【】ate】r protection fo\r】 the worl【d’s oceans 【】ahead【【 of a mee/ting with th】e U/nite】d Nat\ions.The Oscar winner gave an 【imp/assioned spee】ch,\ \call/ing on deleg】ates at the U【N/ Convention on the Law \】of the Sea to agr\ee ta\rgets and give the green【 light to a Gl/obal Oce【ans Treaty./ Su\【ch an agreement /would increase the 】amount of international\ waters\ granted environmen/tal protection from 1% to 30% 】by【 2030.Bardem/ became an activ】ist with Gre/en【peace, focu【sin/g on】 p/rotection/ for An】tarctica at the//【 beginnin\g of\ last year.“The \ocean and its /inhabitants know no bou/ndaries. What ha】ppens in the /hig/h s/eas【, do/\e/sn&rsquo【;t stay /there. Whales, 【\turtles and fish don&rsquo/;t know our bo【r/ders/,&rdqu【o; Bard】em told【 the ass】em】bled media in Time\s 】Square.“They are a【ll co\nnected, and we 】are 】conne/ct\ed \to them.\ Our oce\ans are on the ve\rge of【 collapse and we】 have/\ all p/layed \a huge role in this. Now we mus/t all play\ our part to stop it by securing a st【ron】g Glob【al Ocean【 T【rea】ty.”Bard\em also 】pose/d for pi】ctur\【es alongside a ne】arly 6-metr/e tall【 sculptu\re of w】hales and turtles erec/】ted by Gr/ee】npeac【e outs【i【de N【ew York&【r【squo;s UN【 building. The artwork \rep\resented man】y of the threa】ts【 t/o】 mar】ine】 life from p/l/a\stic pollution to oil drilling, said the env/ironment charity.Threat of【 extinctio】nThi】s f\res【h pus】h【 for【 a Global Oceans Treaty】 comes after the Global Biodiversity Assess】ment Report found more tha\【n /a t/h\ir/d of marine mammals an\d shark speci【es are currently facing t\he threat o【f exti\nction. 】Gr【eenpea/ce has been\ campaigning/【 for th【e policy for more a decade, counting celebrities including Big Little \Lies\ star Shailene Woodley as】【 support\ers\.“Our o【ceans are in cr】isis and existing 【frame\work【s 】for safegu】【arding t【hem are inadequat【e. /Only 1% \of in【ter【national waters, which co】ver almost half the planet, are effecti】vely/ prote【ct/ed,” sa/id Will M\cCallum, Greenpeace o】ceans cam/pa【ign】er.The sculpture installed by Greenpeace depicts tu/rtles】 a/nd whales/ trapped in ghost gear©\【; Stephanie】 Ke【ith / Gr】eenpeace&ldquo【;Restorin】g the【 health of our oceans i\s critical in pre\】serving ma\rine life, tackling the clima/te crisis, and sustaining the lives and li\vel\ihoods of millio【ns of】 people who depend on them. A str】on】g Global Oc\ean \Treaty w/ill pave【 the way for a /【net】work of s】anct\uaries tha\t will p【lace at least a third】 o】f the【 world&rsquo】】;s oceans off-limit【s to hum/an activities.”Dr Essam Yassin Mohammed of t】he\ In/ternation\al Institute for Env\i】ronme】nt and Development said i/t was【 &l\dquo;/surprising&r】dquo; no such /laws were alread【y in effect, su\g】gesti【ng the/ 】n\【ew treaty s/hould pre\vent unsustainable fishing and ensure pari【ty 【of access for developing countries.&ld/quo;Th【e equi】table distributi】o】n of /conse】rvat\ion benefi【ts of /the high seas shou/ld \also be【 at 【the core of the negotiatio/ns. Any ne】w global agreement must ensure that /】de】sign/ated protec】ted ar【e【as consi\de】r h\ow to sup【port coastal communities ac\ross the developing world.”Share this a/rticle 【 More from life

Small】, independent fisheries are slo\w/l【y making 】their return after almost being wiped 【out by Denma【rk【's d\ecisio】n to privati\se f\ishing 【qu】\【otas a 【de\cade a/go【, whi/ch allowed big companies to assert their d】ominance in/ t】he f/ishing market.The\ EU\&rsqu/o\;s Common \Fish\eries Policy le】ave\s it up to member states to decide how to allocate i\t//s n【】ational fi】shing qu/ota 】to\ its fishing fle\et.With market prices】 skyr\ocketing】, small fis】heries 】were pushed to sell the/ir \boats and leave the 【trade.So/me fishe\rmen say】【 the beam t\r\awl/ers also】】 had a de】t/rim【ental 【environmental impact b】y\ damaging seabeds.】W\orking /to】/getherF\ish【ermen in the North W/estern town of Thorups】trand decided it was time to take actio【n 【to /ensure their to/wn】, an/d oth【er /fishing vil】lage\s weren't wiped【 off the map by the quota sys\】tem.Cooperatives were es/ta】\blis\hed to all【ow fishermen to band t】ogether, bu/y\ and share quotas【 am\ongst t/he\mselves】.T/h】is also ensured traditional boat making, a D\anish i\con /】sin【ce the Viki】\ng【 ti】mes, has been able 【t】o thrive\ on【ce mo/re.The European\ Union has also seen the potential in this\, partially fun\ding a boatyard to build vessels and t】rain n/ew craftsmen, in turn\ cr\】e【ating local opportunities f\or ele\ctricians an\d engi/neers, as well as an 【attr【action for tourists.S】mall sc\ale fishin/g【 in Eur\opeThe European Union recog【nises the i【mp】ortance of small 】scale/ fi】she/【【ries \acr\oss the con/tinent, invest/ing an es】timated 212.4 million Eu】ros (the /estimated total\ p\ublic budget】 target【ed on small\ scal【e】 fisheries, EMF】F) into various projects ov】er 】20】14-2020.In the Me【diterranean and Black Sea /regions, small s\cale fisheries repres【ent over 80% of t/\he】 t【o/tal fishing fleet a】nd】 employ over 60% of t【he to【ta/【l workforce within the sector.\Cat\ch of【 the dayWith sustainable sea\fo】o【d a gro/wing food t/rend, Thorups【tran\d 【/has set up shop in one of the world's cul/in/ary capit\als.The】 town has entered th】e lucrative Copenhagen market,】 selli【ng fresh fis/h on a】 co\n\verted【】 boat in the heart of the city centre\.Ch【ef Simon Biggas M&o【slash\;【lle【r say\s\ /he hopes Thorupstrand will help to inspire ot\her to【wn\s to 【follow 【suit and】 embrace sust【a【inable f/is】h【ing coop/e】ratives.12 】 【 OCEAN EP5 - Smal【【l scale fishe\ri】es / \ / 【 】 12 / \ 【 / / 】 OCEAN EP5 - Small scale fisher】ies 】 / 】 1【2 】】 / 【 OCEAN EP5 - S【mall s【cale fisheries \ 【 / 【 12 】 【 \ / OCEAN \/EP5 - Smal/l scale f\isheries 【 / \】12 】 OCEAN EP5 - Small scale fish\er/ies 】 】 【 【 / 12 \ 】 】 【 \ 【 / OCEAN EP/5 - Small scale //fisheries 】 / 】/ / \ 12 【【 / 】【 【/ /\ 】 】 OC【EAN EP5 - Small s【cale【 fish/eries \ 【 【【 / 】 12 【 OCEAN EP5 - Sm/all 】scal\e/ fisheries 】 12 / \ 】 / \ / \ OCEAN 【E/P5 - Small scale /fisheries \ \ 】 \ / 】\ Journalist na\me • Denis 】Loct/ierVi\deo ed【itor • Je【an-Christophe Marca】】udShare/ this a】rticleCopy/paste the article video em】bed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendSh/a【r】eTweetShares/endMoreH/ideShareSendShare】ShareSha/reSendShareSh\are】You might also like 【【 / / / Acti】vists 】are raising \funds to save Da【ni【sh woo】den boats \ More /】aboutF\isheryEnvironmen/tal pr【otec【ti】onDenmark 【 Most viewed / / What influence o【n climate is the coronavirus 【lockdown\ r/eally\ havin/g? 【 Th【e new AI system sa\feguardin】\g premature babies fro】m infection / \ 】 Messen】ger RNA: the molecule th/at/ may【 teach o】ur bo/d】\ies to bea\t cance\r / 】 【 】 \ \ / \ \Apple/ and Google sa【y they/'ll w//ork together to trace spread of coronavirus /via smartphones\ 【 】 【 】 】 How EU fund\in/g is changin【g the face of L【atvi】an innovation Browse t】oday's tagsText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from lifeGlobal energy\ demand\ debated at A】/\bu Dha/bi Sustain】abilit\y WeekA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagsCan corals i/n Jordan sa\ve ot【her reefs from g【lobal warming?Can 【econom\ic grow/th and protectin】g the env【【ironment go hand in hand? 】In this episode【】 of 】Bu】siness\ 】Planet】 Euronews travelled t】o A/ust\r\ia to look at the efforts whi/ch are underway to fost【er inn\ovati】on, transform industry and create su【st【ainable growth 】across Europe. "Sustai】nabl【【e econo/mic【 development /aims】 t【/o /reach a balanc【e between envir【onmental\ and climate protection】, qu】ali/ty【 of 】life and economic gr】owth. 】I【t's pos】sible to observ【e, through】 our em】pirical data, that【 the green econ【omy is a driver fo【r】 growth/. In the past fe【w\ 】】ye】ars, \the Austrian environmental technology 【industry has grown almost t\wice as fast/ a【\s the /economy /as a whole in re\cent years," Andreas Tschulik, Austrian environment minist】【/ry.The Eu\ropean Commission is invest】ing 】in】 EU industry for a modern, clean and fair/】 】eco\n】】om/y. One company w\hich epitomise【s this drive \is ECOP Technolog/ies, near V】ienna. The 【co】mpany 【manufac【/tur【【es rotatio【n heat pumps for industrial use. Using innovative techno【logy \the firm helps other companies to recover en\e/rgy and /】save cost【s whi\c】h 】in turn\ help\s protect the e\nvi\ronment【."With our rotation he/at pump we r\each i\n 【specific appl/ications return on【 inves\tm【ents 】with/in three to seve/n years and 【compared to \burning gas,/ but we save an/ enor【mous amoun\/t o【/】f CO2 and this is the reason why we get supp/o】rted by 】the EU th\rough the/ horizon 20 program," says \ ECOP's 】CEO, Bernha\rd Adler. 】 \ECO】P's /innovative work saw it win this y\ear's【 European Busi】ness Aw\ard for Environ\/m】e\nt."Innovation is the key to tr\ansform th\e】 current eco\nomic system 】into a gre\en economy. \/Wit【h】out inn【ov】ati】o\n/ we will n】ot be able to r/each our glo/ba/l climate protection goals. Abov】e average investment into research and 】development】 res【ults in above average grow】th/," in\sists Tschulig. ​ He adds, "\Our top envir【onm\ental po\licy goals are to cut greenhouse gas emissions and /r/educe /consumption.【 A lot o/f compan/ies realise【 this a】nd 【are/ ta/king a【/dvan/tage【 of the 】resulting bus/ines【s opportunit\ies. But t/】he /whole of socie】t/y is ben【efiting【 from thi\s, given t/hat many\ gre\en jobs have been creat】ed throughout the whole valu】e chain."&\#8203; 【 Top EU innovatio【n prioritiesEncouraging innovation and inve】stment to【 crea/te new \jobs and b\oost gr\owth has always】/ been a prior\ity【 for the EU.G/rowth cannot com/e a\t t\he cost of the environme【nt. We need sustainab/ility.Protection of the environment/ and 】sus/tainabl/e development both demand \in/nova\tio/n.Innovatio【n 】bridges t\h【e gap between research an\d the market, making ideas that pr\otect the enviro【nment comm\er【cially\ viable.T\he E/U org】anises the E【urope【an Busines【s 【Awards to recog/nise compan/ies putti】ng inn】】/ovati【on /【a\nd sustainable devel\opment at the heart of their busi】/ness acti/vities.】The a【wards are presented ev/ery two y【ears in five categ/ories: Manage/me【nt, Product and services, Process i【nnovat/ion, International business\ c【oo/peration and Business and bio/div【er/sity.The 2018 】Awar/ds w/ere presented on 14 November in Vienna, Austria.Sha【re thi【s articleCopy】/past\e the article video embed link below:Cop】yShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSh】aresendMoreHideShareSendS/hareShareShareS【endS】hareShareMo/】re aboutBusinessAustriaEnv】iron】mental p【/】/rotection Bro】wse today's ta】gs,如下图

Te/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placesText sizeAaAaA\s on【e/ of the o【r\ganisations aiming to】 tackle marine plast/ic pollution, the \S】eychelles Is/l【a【nd Foundation【 has just\ 】released a video 】(click on \the player/ abo】ve) proving that e/ven 【the most remote corners 【o\f the ocean are suffering from the horrors of plastic waste and【 endang/e【red a【nimals. UNES\】CO World He/ritage Sites】 are no exception/. 】It is/ claimed that【 【if the present】 tren/d 】contin/ues, 】oce【ans \could con\tain 】more plastic than fish by 50.\/From bag/s 【to bottles, a/round 13 million tonnes of 【p】lastic flows int\o our oceans eve】ry/ year, acco\rding to a rece/nt UN report. Marine spe/cies ingest or become entangled in plastic de\bris, sometimes cau\s】ing injury or even death. The UN says 100,0/00\ marine animals die each y】ear d\ue to /plastic related causes.On【 many African【 i\slands, /\including the Seychelles, a growing num】/b【er of 【steps】 have bee】n implemented as envi【ro】nm【entalism and tourism ha\ve 】to go hand in hand to protect the /future of th】ese areas.】Click o【n the video【 above to see how】/ \the l\o/cals are abo/ut to s\ave one of the wo/】rld's/ most exclusive \destinations as well as part of 】the /Indian Oc\ean.Share this article】 】 Mo/re from places

【Coron【【/avirus in Europe:】 W【h】/y has Portu【gal not been as ba】dly hit by /COVID-19 a\s n\e/ighbour【 S\pai【n?

如下图

精工科技Living Recommends | Rewilding our relati】onship with ou//r wardrobe【/Spar】kle look\s to a gre///ener futu\r\e with the op\ening of its fourth data centre in GreeceDub】ai acts to ste【m the 】ti【de of single use plasticDefo\restation in 【the Brazilian Amazon \rainforest went up by 13.7% between August 2017 a【nd\// /July 2018【, accordin】g\ t【o the \coun】t【r/y’s\ Natio/n/al I/nstitute for /Space Researc\h (I\NPE).The INPE】 said that【 becau/se /of the incr/eased/ deforestation,\ Brazil had lost a\ total area of 7.900 km&/sup【】2; of rainforest, which G\reen【peace Br/azil estimates is c】lo\se t\o a million】 football pit【ch【es or five times the 【\size of 【London — Europe's larg/est city by\ area.Brazil has t】he\ largest】 sur/face of the A】mazon rain【forest in South Ame【rica.Our pic\ture gallery shows 【the scope of deforestation this pa】st year /in Brazil's Amazon for】est/....New Gallery 2018】//28 © Christian 【Bra【ga / 【Green】peac】eo【riginal/date 1/1/0001 6:00:0/0 AMwidth \】1200he\igh】t 801 &cop【y/】; Christian Braga \/ Greenpeaceoriginaldate 1/1/00/01 6:00:00 AMwidth】 2】5】/00height/ 16REU\TERS/UESLEI MARCELINOor/iginaldate \/1/1/0【001 6:00:00 AMwidth 6720heigh/t 4480 © C/hristian Braga /\【【 Gre】e】np【eacecameramake NIKON C【ORPORATIONfocal/length 24h【ei/ght 800fnumber 6.3exposu/retime】 0.】00062【5alt: 2/60lat【: 【/-10.754733【l/ong: -68.743800】c【/amerasoftwa【re Adob【e\ Photosho】】p Lighoriginaldate 10//3/2018】 3:50:36 PM\width 1200c\ameramod/】el /NIKON /D850 © C/hristian Braga / Greenpeac【ecameramake NIKON CO/R【PORA】T/IONfocal】leng】】th 31height 800fnumber 【10e\xposuretime 【0.000】al【t: 240la/t: -9.8】9893/3long: -68.710900camerasoftwar】e Adobe】/ Photoshop Lighor\iginaldate 10/3】//20 5:32:40 PMwidt\h 1200cameramo【del NIKON D850 © Christian Braga / Greenp/ea【cecam】eramake 】NI\K\ON CORPORATIONfocallength 95he【ight 800fnumber 4.5\exp\osuretime 0.000】625cameraso【ftware Adobe Pho】toshop L【ighorigi/naldat/e 10】/2/2018【 9:43: PMwidth /1200\cameramodel N\IKON【 D850According to Gr【eenpeace Brazil, the /cause for 】the i【\ncreased defore/station lies in】 【Brasilia with the government.The NGO blam\es the rural lob\by i【n【 C【ongress for\【 &ldqu】o;threat\ening the rainforest, its peop】le,\ and the planet’s climate&【rdquo;.The l【obb】y’】s agenda incl【udes promo/tin【g farm/ers’ rights, expa【nd\ing】 arable lan\d in the country, and opposes the e【xpa【nsion of indigenous lands, according to 【\【Brazilian me【dia.“This set o】f pr】opo【s】als benefit those who want t【o destroy】 the rainfor【est, g\rind l】an【d】\, and steal the natur/al】 heri【\ta【ge of the Brazilian peop【le. The consequences are translated into 】the a】moun【】t of\ destruction/ in the Amazo】n,” said M\arcio Astrini, coor/di/【nator of public policy for Gre/e/npeace 】Br/azil.Brazil's 【environment minister/ Edson Duarte said i/n 【a statement】 that illegal logging was the main fact\o【r for 】the increas【ed de\forestation. While Brazil's Cl/i\ma/te Ob】servatory, a net】【work of NGOs, said in another statement that ap】art fro\m/ illegal loggin\g it was the growi】ng】 commodities s】ector that was\ c【on/tributin\g to fo【re【st destruc】tion. The green NGO also w/arns th】at the environmental politi/c】s of Braz】il's ne】w presiden【t【, Jair B【olsona\ro, co\uld furth\er devastate the 】rainforest."He's\ said \that\ he would put an end to protecte【d areas【, to lands reserve】d to indigenous communities, that h】e would reduce inspections /and sanctions aga/】in/st e】nvironmental cri】mes. Every】thing that reduc【ed def【orestation 【before. If he 【elimin\ate】s】 all of this,/】 it would trigger a【n unimaginable si/tuation," said Astrini】.Euronews has reached out to【 G】ree【npeace Brazil for comment\ on th/e current defore/station of Br\az\il's Amazon ra】in】forest.Share this articleShareTweetSha/resendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShareSha/re\Send【Sha【reShareYou might a\lso \like \】】 Watch:】 Footage of uncontacted Amazon t】ri/be m】emb/ers e/merges/ as /deforesta【tion expands \ \ \ \ 】 【 Amazon wildfires: Wh【y is\ the South /Americ/an rainforest 【so important? 】 】 \ 】 / Amazon fires 】generate smoke clo】ud almost a/s \bi\g as devastating\ Siberia blaze \ 【\】 //M\ore a/boutEnvironment\Envir】onm】ental protectionBrazilAm\azonia 【 Browse today【'\;\s tags

The ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gs

MEPs ba/ck initiati\ve to reduce p/lastic waste a\n\d improve water quality

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Deep sea explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau 【teaches UAE childr\en abou\/t \ocean c/o】nse\rva/tionDanish fisheries take back contr】olText sizeAaAaJames Bo/nd actor】 J\avier Bardem has tak\】e/n to t【he streets of New York’s Tim】es Square【 to demand gre【】ate】r protection fo\r】 the worl【d’s oceans 【】ahead【【 of a mee/ting with th】e U/nite】d Nat\ions.The Oscar winner gave an 【imp/assioned spee】ch,\ \call/ing on deleg】ates at the U【N/ Convention on the Law \】of the Sea to agr\ee ta\rgets and give the green【 light to a Gl/obal Oce【ans Treaty./ Su\【ch an agreement /would increase the 】amount of international\ waters\ granted environmen/tal protection from 1% to 30% 】by【 2030.Bardem/ became an activ】ist with Gre/en【peace, focu【sin/g on】 p/rotection/ for An】tarctica at the//【 beginnin\g of\ last year.“The \ocean and its /inhabitants know no bou/ndaries. What ha】ppens in the /hig/h s/eas【, do/\e/sn&rsquo【;t stay /there. Whales, 【\turtles and fish don&rsquo/;t know our bo【r/ders/,&rdqu【o; Bard】em told【 the ass】em】bled media in Time\s 】Square.“They are a【ll co\nnected, and we 】are 】conne/ct\ed \to them.\ Our oce\ans are on the ve\rge of【 collapse and we】 have/\ all p/layed \a huge role in this. Now we mus/t all play\ our part to stop it by securing a st【ron】g Glob【al Ocean【 T【rea】ty.”Bard\em also 】pose/d for pi】ctur\【es alongside a ne】arly 6-metr/e tall【 sculptu\re of w】hales and turtles erec/】ted by Gr/ee】npeac【e outs【i【de N【ew York&【r【squo;s UN【 building. The artwork \rep\resented man】y of the threa】ts【 t/o】 mar】ine】 life from p/l/a\stic pollution to oil drilling, said the env/ironment charity.Threat of【 extinctio】nThi】s f\res【h pus】h【 for【 a Global Oceans Treaty】 comes after the Global Biodiversity Assess】ment Report found more tha\【n /a t/h\ir/d of marine mammals an\d shark speci【es are currently facing t\he threat o【f exti\nction. 】Gr【eenpea/ce has been\ campaigning/【 for th【e policy for more a decade, counting celebrities including Big Little \Lies\ star Shailene Woodley as】【 support\ers\.“Our o【ceans are in cr】isis and existing 【frame\work【s 】for safegu】【arding t【hem are inadequat【e. /Only 1% \of in【ter【national waters, which co】ver almost half the planet, are effecti】vely/ prote【ct/ed,” sa/id Will M\cCallum, Greenpeace o】ceans cam/pa【ign】er.The sculpture installed by Greenpeace depicts tu/rtles】 a/nd whales/ trapped in ghost gear©\【; Stephanie】 Ke【ith / Gr】eenpeace&ldquo【;Restorin】g the【 health of our oceans i\s critical in pre\】serving ma\rine life, tackling the clima/te crisis, and sustaining the lives and li\vel\ihoods of millio【ns of】 people who depend on them. A str】on】g Global Oc\ean \Treaty w/ill pave【 the way for a /【net】work of s】anct\uaries tha\t will p【lace at least a third】 o】f the【 world&rsquo】】;s oceans off-limit【s to hum/an activities.”Dr Essam Yassin Mohammed of t】he\ In/ternation\al Institute for Env\i】ronme】nt and Development said i/t was【 &l\dquo;/surprising&r】dquo; no such /laws were alread【y in effect, su\g】gesti【ng the/ 】n\【ew treaty s/hould pre\vent unsustainable fishing and ensure pari【ty 【of access for developing countries.&ld/quo;Th【e equi】table distributi】o】n of /conse】rvat\ion benefi【ts of /the high seas shou/ld \also be【 at 【the core of the negotiatio/ns. Any ne】w global agreement must ensure that /】de】sign/ated protec】ted ar【e【as consi\de】r h\ow to sup【port coastal communities ac\ross the developing world.”Share this a/rticle 【 More from lifeTradition and innov】ation in car b【odywork\Ocean【【o】gr\a】phe\r and envir】onmentalist, Jean-Mi】\chel Cousteau, p【a】id/ his f/irst visit to th/e United Arab Emira【tes as 】part of his edu】cation【al conservation programm】e.During hi/s s\tay in the\ emi【rates, Co/ust\eau spoke/ /to more th】an 100 s【ch/oo/l children【 a】b\out the world\&r】squo;s fragile aqu【a【tic ec】osystem.&/ldquo;If you protect the ocean/, y【ou【 】/protec【【t/ yourself,”】 he told the】 you】ng a【udien\ce.】The interactive lear【ning initiativ【e is part of Co】ust\eau’s O【cean Futures Society, which he fo】unded in 1999 with the intention of giving “a voice to the ocean.”Je\a\n-Michel Cousteau teaches【 kids in/ 】th/】e UAE ab【out o】cean c/onse\r【vationABO】UT JEA\N-MICHEL COUSTEAUCoustea】u&rsquo\;s interest in \con】serving t/he \waters of/ the wo】rld b/egan around the ag【e】 of seven when he/ was /t【aken divin】g by his f【a【ther, the re\nowned explorer, fi/lmmaker and scienti】st Jacq【ues-Yve/s】 Couste\au.In /an 】interv【iew【 with Euron【ews, Jean-Michel sai/d that /it/ was his【 family which\ encouraged him\【 to share knowledge 】and start dialogues【 with】 】people to/ spread his ecological 】message.“I【've/ learned a lot of that fro\m my fath\er,&\r【dquo; h\e says.\ &ld/quo;You\ never【, n【ever criticize. Forget about\ that. 【You neve\r【/ point a finger】,】 bec】ause when you point a finger there are th/ree coming back at you.”“You try to have an oppo/r】tunity \to meet and then you ca【n reach each】 o】ther'/s\ h/earts,&rd【【quo; \he added.During h/is long 】career, 81-year-old Cousteau ha\s【 directed more than 80 【films/ and do\c】ume/ntaries, all themed】 on】 sa】fegu【arding the future of t】he planet’s se/as and oc【eans.His current \researc/h e】】xplores how ho//l/i【day resorts】 can minimize thei\/r environmental impact a【nd he recently campaigne/d aga/i【nst the captivi\ty of 100 whales 】\in Russia.Je【an-Michel C】ou/st/eau durin/g inter/view wit/h/ EuronewsWhilst】 plastics are/ a hot topic when i】t com\es t【o/ the 【poll/ution of glob】al ocea】ns, Cousteau is flagging up\ the【 haz】ards of lesser】-know】n】 【wa】】st【e prod\ucts tha】t end up 】in/ our water\wa】ys.】“There are\ hundreds of differen/t/ chemicals,” h\e says/. “\【You take a t】ablet】 of as\pirin and hopefully, it takes care of your headache, [but] where is that chemical going? Righ【t into t】he ocean.&rdquo【;】Cousteau also \highlighted /how p】olluted 】wat\ers had an affect on the human body,\ citing his【 own rece/nt m/edi【\】cal assessment for leve\ls of toxicity.“I was tested with 32 differ】ent t【ypes of chemicals a【nd two types \of heavy 】metal/s,” he revea/led.Jean-Michel Cous/teau /divin\gAs fo/r how to cur【b or elimi\nate dest】ructive environ】ment【/al factors, Co【usteau s/】a\id he bel/ieves that 【better management of natur/al resources【 wa】s 】key.\“/There are hug】e opportunities now to capture all these 】/runo/ffs,&【rdquo; he remarke】d. &\ldquo;And 【we can make】 money doing that because in nature there's n/o was/te, everything is a re【source.”Whils\t s/howing no signs of re/ti【ring】 from his passion of aq】ua】tic conserva【ti】\on, C/o/\uste】/au beli\eves【 that the future of his work is safeg/uarde/d by his son and daughter who are also involve/d\ in the\ 【scientifi\c disci/pline and “heading in the right dir【ection.&rdqu\o;SEEN ON SOCIAL: EXPLOR\ING THE REG\ION’S WATERSEkaterina from 【\Russia 【po【sted a picture of her d/ive to 【a ship wr\eck in Sudan. View 【this post on Inst\agramUnd【erwater SWAT. U【m\bria wreckA post shared by Katerina Kali/nina (@【guzuguzu】) on Mar 8/, /20【17 at 10:57am PST【And Andri\y fro【m U\kraine went\ 】for a dive with】 red fish in Egypt’s Re/d【 Sea\. View this 】post 】on InstagramLifeti】me memories ?&】z】wj;&\#9794;️???A pos/t shared by &\#1040;n【drey Deniskin (@a.\deniskin11) on May 18, 2019 at 8:02am PD】TShare this articleCopy/paste the 【a\rticle video embed l\in/k【 below:CopyShare】Tw】eetSharesen\dShareTweetSharese】ndMore】/\HideShareSendS/h\areShar/eSh】ar【eSend】ShareSh】areYou might also like \ \ Watch: 【Woman set /for epic/】 journey /f/lying migration route 【of endangered【 osprey / 【 / 】 Global energy dem】a】nd deba【/te\/d 】at 【Abu Dhabi Sustainabilit【y Week 】 /】 \ How 】is th【e UAE tackling its food【 waste problem? 】 // More abou\tEnvironmental protectionEcology【Oc【ean【United Arab Emi【rates 【 Browse today's tags

2.手机网上捕鱼。

Mussel fa/rms 】fight a\g【ainst【 pollution in \the Baltic; one of the \most polluted seas in the worldHow can we b/alance urbanisatio】n with protec【/ting the en】vironment and qua/l\ity of life?“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Do e【nvironmental documentaries actually have an impac【t on p【eople’s bad】 ha/bits? 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsText sizeAaAaJames Bo/nd actor】 J\avier Bardem has tak\】e/n to t【he streets of New York’s Tim】es Square【 to demand gre【】ate】r protection fo\r】 the worl【d’s oceans 【】ahead【【 of a mee/ting with th】e U/nite】d Nat\ions.The Oscar winner gave an 【imp/assioned spee】ch,\ \call/ing on deleg】ates at the U【N/ Convention on the Law \】of the Sea to agr\ee ta\rgets and give the green【 light to a Gl/obal Oce【ans Treaty./ Su\【ch an agreement /would increase the 】amount of international\ waters\ granted environmen/tal protection from 1% to 30% 】by【 2030.Bardem/ became an activ】ist with Gre/en【peace, focu【sin/g on】 p/rotection/ for An】tarctica at the//【 beginnin\g of\ last year.“The \ocean and its /inhabitants know no bou/ndaries. What ha】ppens in the /hig/h s/eas【, do/\e/sn&rsquo【;t stay /there. Whales, 【\turtles and fish don&rsquo/;t know our bo【r/ders/,&rdqu【o; Bard】em told【 the ass】em】bled media in Time\s 】Square.“They are a【ll co\nnected, and we 】are 】conne/ct\ed \to them.\ Our oce\ans are on the ve\rge of【 collapse and we】 have/\ all p/layed \a huge role in this. Now we mus/t all play\ our part to stop it by securing a st【ron】g Glob【al Ocean【 T【rea】ty.”Bard\em also 】pose/d for pi】ctur\【es alongside a ne】arly 6-metr/e tall【 sculptu\re of w】hales and turtles erec/】ted by Gr/ee】npeac【e outs【i【de N【ew York&【r【squo;s UN【 building. The artwork \rep\resented man】y of the threa】ts【 t/o】 mar】ine】 life from p/l/a\stic pollution to oil drilling, said the env/ironment charity.Threat of【 extinctio】nThi】s f\res【h pus】h【 for【 a Global Oceans Treaty】 comes after the Global Biodiversity Assess】ment Report found more tha\【n /a t/h\ir/d of marine mammals an\d shark speci【es are currently facing t\he threat o【f exti\nction. 】Gr【eenpea/ce has been\ campaigning/【 for th【e policy for more a decade, counting celebrities including Big Little \Lies\ star Shailene Woodley as】【 support\ers\.“Our o【ceans are in cr】isis and existing 【frame\work【s 】for safegu】【arding t【hem are inadequat【e. /Only 1% \of in【ter【national waters, which co】ver almost half the planet, are effecti】vely/ prote【ct/ed,” sa/id Will M\cCallum, Greenpeace o】ceans cam/pa【ign】er.The sculpture installed by Greenpeace depicts tu/rtles】 a/nd whales/ trapped in ghost gear©\【; Stephanie】 Ke【ith / Gr】eenpeace&ldquo【;Restorin】g the【 health of our oceans i\s critical in pre\】serving ma\rine life, tackling the clima/te crisis, and sustaining the lives and li\vel\ihoods of millio【ns of】 people who depend on them. A str】on】g Global Oc\ean \Treaty w/ill pave【 the way for a /【net】work of s】anct\uaries tha\t will p【lace at least a third】 o】f the【 world&rsquo】】;s oceans off-limit【s to hum/an activities.”Dr Essam Yassin Mohammed of t】he\ In/ternation\al Institute for Env\i】ronme】nt and Development said i/t was【 &l\dquo;/surprising&r】dquo; no such /laws were alread【y in effect, su\g】gesti【ng the/ 】n\【ew treaty s/hould pre\vent unsustainable fishing and ensure pari【ty 【of access for developing countries.&ld/quo;Th【e equi】table distributi】o】n of /conse】rvat\ion benefi【ts of /the high seas shou/ld \also be【 at 【the core of the negotiatio/ns. Any ne】w global agreement must ensure that /】de】sign/ated protec】ted ar【e【as consi\de】r h\ow to sup【port coastal communities ac\ross the developing world.”Share this a/rticle 【 More from lifeThe Ol\d Port, Mars】eille\’s popular wa】terfro/nt, h\ides a dirty secret.Electric scooter【s, tires a【nd pla】s】tic bottles litter 【【the seafloor.Annual clean-up operationEver【/y 】【ye】ar, volunte/e/rs gat/her/ to clean up some of /the mess. Hundreds of scuba divers collect th/e \rubbish, whic】h is t【h/en【 sor\ted\ an【】d rec\ycled, or otherwise safely dispose/d】 of,【 by 】l】oc\al activists.&ldqu】o;We find a 【lot of【 scooters, ra【i【ling【s, cans, bottle【s,” says Angie Espine【l Caño【n, 】a volun【\t/eer with// Team 13. &ld【quo;The goal【 i【sn&rsqu/o;t just to clean up, it&rs/quo;s also to 】ra】】ise awareness】.&r/dquo;“Last year, we recover【ed 91【m3 /of \waste,” s/ays I\sabelle P/oi】tou/, anoth】er volunt【eer f】】rom the Merterre Associa/tio\n. “The year【 before it】 was 13】1m3, so \that’s a decrease of 40m/3. This/ year, j【udging \from what I c/an s【ee】 and my experience, \I’d say it&rsquo】;s les\s again."We fin】d a lot /of scooters, rail/ings, \cans and bot/tles. The goal isn’t just to clean up, it【’s also to raise awareness. 【 Angie Espinel Cañ/【on / Vo【luntee】r, Team 13 】 With smu\rfs 】for ma】scots, the\ event】 i【s】 a part of the "EU Be】ach Cleanup" campaign -\ h【elping to raise aw//areness of the Europe/an response /to th】e\ marine p】ol【lut/【i【on pro\blem【. One o/f【 the divers is Alai\n Dumor/t — 【the EU’s representa/tive in Mars/eille.“Some 】waste is potentially 】recyclable,&rd/quo; says Dum\ort【. “But 【unfortu\nately 【【not/ sin\【gle-use objects, which go strai\ght in the bi/n. That's why from 2021 the /EU /will 】be banni\】n/g all this kind of single\-use utensils &\mdash; pla】tes, s】tir【rers, cotton bu【ds, /and so on - all the things yo/u fr【】equently find on be】ac】】he\s will be banned.”Mos】t ocean waste co/mes from urban areasAn imp\ortant aspect of the campaign is public outre/ach. Mi】【llions 】of tons of/ waste - mostly coming from u/rban are\a】【s - 】en】d /up in \the ocean 】every/ yea\/r】/.】 It’s been calc\ulated that on every square】 mile /of ocean, thous【ands of piec】es o\f rubbish \are floating./“The fig\ures【 【show that【 80% of marine li\tter originates on land,” ex\pl】ains Olivier Bianchimani/, th】e dir】ector of Septentri\on 】Environneme\nt. “It'【s eithe【r w/ashed away【 by 】/rivers or dis【carded/ d【irectl】y into/ the sea. As you can imagi\ne, it wasn't wind that brough】t r/ailings and bicycles /here.”At \over 【7【0 beach cle】an\up eve【nts organised t\his year b【y the EU a【nd the UN, almost 40 /000\ participants collect\ed ar】ound 】850 ton/s of waste &md\ash; from Camb【/odia to Haiti - and Argenti/】na to】 No【rway.The】 figu/】res show 】\】that 80% of ma/【rin\e litter ori】ginates【 on la/nd. 【 【 【 【Ol【ivier Bianchimani 【 【 Director, Septent】r/ion】 Environnement 【 &ldqu】\o/;This needs to be s/een i/n a【 much broade\r c【ontex】t,&rdq【uo; says Dumort. \&ldqu\o;Ot】herwi【se t\】his would be a loca【l event,【 and you’d be asking \wha\t's】 Europe go【t to do with it. Europe's involved/ precisely because this is a globa】l problem, and 】requi】res a whole s/eries 】o】f a/ct/ions and laws a】t an i】nternational l\/e】v】el.”The Euro/pean Union is\ leading the globa】l 】fight \aga/inst marine li】tter.【 Be//sides its 【policies curbing single-use p\【lastics【 and re/ducing waste from lost fishing gear, the /EU has earmark】/ed\ €350 million for research an【d deve【lopment.Mini-cata】maran scoops】 debris from t\he wa】ter\One/ of the EU-supported tec/hnologies is WasteSha【rk,【 devel【oped in Rotterd】am. A re\motely contr\olled 【m【in\i-catamara】n removes plastics /and othe【r floating deb【ris from【】 the surface of t/he water. Its sen【sors can monito【r pollution levels and \other environmental indi\cator】s. It's electri\call/y powered, emission-\free and ca\n collect hundreds of】 kilos of rubbish/\ at a time.“What we'/re】 trying to do is 】create a \small /enough vessel that will 【get into ti】ght spaces w\here waste col\lect\s, particularly in ha/【rbours and ports, and s/top all【 that waste bei【ng taken out into the greater ocean," says Richard Ha【rdiman, the 【founder on Ranmarine T\echn】ologi/es, the startup behi】nd WasteShark.【The bas】ic function of the WasteShar【/k is very simple. But \ins】ide, it【's a】lways changing &mdash】; 【we【're al【ways trying to make it lighter, mo\re eff/icient/, ea】s\ier to do maintenance on. \ /T】\essa Despinic \ 【 / WasteS【hark】 Design Engineer \ 【 】 / \Ranmarine alrea【d【y has c】us】t\omers in s\everal countries. Enginee【rs ar【e workin\g to make the d\evice\ ful【ly auto\nomous — so it】 can\ c】ollect litter and br\ing 】it back t/o the /recharging station /wi【t【h the need for a pilot.“The】】 basi】c \【【fun【ction】 】of the Wast\eShark is very simple,” says 】d】esi/gn engineer Tess\a Despinic. 】&ldq【uo;It just s】wi】m\s around and collec\t\s【 【tras【h from the su】rface. B【u\/t inside, it's alwa\ys chang/【ing — we're【 \always trying to mak//e it 】\lighter, more effic】ient, easie】r to 】do maintenance\ on. And we're also【 building a\n a【utonomous version t/hat will swim \aroun】d according】 to/ waypo/ints that yo\u give it. So w【e're a\lways wor【king on th】at and】 maki】ng it better.】"I\n the near future\, the de/velop/e】【rs envisage swarms 【of their rob【ots \picking up floa/】ting rubbi/【sh.“I have\ /a】 vision in my hea【【d that keeps m\e】 going,” says Hard/iman. “Tha/t is what we'd be sitt/ing in a\ c\ontrol room an】d from our site, we could see whe】re e/very drone is acros【s th\e planet, how many are【 operating, how 【/much waste is bei\】ng caught — an/d actually see the real impact 】of 】that these things are ma【king around the wor】ld."Technical s【【olutions an】d clean-up campaigns are important. But the simple way】 to keep our se【as】 \hea】lt【hier is to\ drop less litter — a】】nd】 tha【t’s】 a lesson for childre\n and/ adults alike.121212121Share\ t/his articleCopy/past】e the a】rticle v\】id】eo 【embe【d li】nk below:CopyShareT/weetSharesendS/har【/】eTweetSharesendMo/reHideShareSendShareSha/reShareSendShareShareYou migh】t also like \ / 】 Wha/t/’s killing/ ou\r und】erwater ecosystems? / 【 Mor\e 【abo\【utContamination of wate【rEnvironmen\tal prote】ctionSea Most viewe/d 】 \ 】 W\hat influence on \climate is 】the coron/avirus】【 】\lockdown really having? 】 【 【 \ The new AI system saf/egu】/【arding pre/mature /babi】es\ from infect\io\n 】【 Messenger/ RNA: 【the mo/【lecule that may teach our bodies to beat c/ancer 【 】 / \ 【【 【 【 Apple a】】nd Google /say they\'ll wor\k toge\ther to trace spread of cor】onaviru】s vi\【a smartphones / Ho/w EU fundin/g is ch\anging the f/ace of Lat】vian innova/ti/on / Brow【se today's ta/gs

3.手机网上捕鱼。

Hi/ppos play a【【 key role in maintaining ecosys【】t【ems..\. wi/th their poop\ 【The Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsFamily-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net widerSoybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020

4.How to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eater。

Mussel fa/rms 】fight a\g【ainst【 pollution in \the Baltic; one of the \most polluted seas in the worldAn international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gsThe European Union he/ld its fir【st post-B/rexit/【 summit h\alf【 a\ year before Br】//exit.And in\ orde】【r【 to 【get ev【erybody used \to\ it, The】resa May was 【absent.Which】 ma【de sense, as】 th\e meeting informally d/iscuss\ed what 【Europe's fut【ure 】priorities should look like.Nobody wanted h【er to be part of that c【onversa\【tio【\】n, and/ t【he B\ritish\ Pr】ime Minis/ter 【w\as /probably relieved not to h/ave to contribute to 】t/hat brain【s\torm\/ing.London might also hav/e been uncomfort【/able wit/h the venue: the 】city of Sib】iu in T/rans【ylvania】 where D\racula came from, especially with t/he /next Bre【xit】 deadline falling on H\alloween.T\he EU leaders /ag\reed o】n【\】 ten points regardin/】g the fut/ure o/f Europe.Cli/mate change featured only tenth as a/ prio/rity &n/dash;】 a fact that was \immediately critic【ized /by the E【uropean Gre【en】s, not present i】n S\ibiu.They called\】 it an insu\lt to th\e young people who have bee/n vo\icing\ their 【concerns about climate chan\ge for mont\hs.Yet not everything 【is【 gl/oomy when it /】/come t/\o\ environmental politics in Europe.The day before the summit,/ eight membe/r states 【【present【ed a plan to【 cut CO2 【emissions 【t【o net zero/ by 2050.Notably】 absent was a countr】y that cut emissions twice as muc【h/ a】s the EU average last ye【ar –\ Germany.Wher\eas E】urope was trying t\o tackle climate change politically,】 the world was dist】【racted by another crisis.One that could e【asily 】【】intensify in the months ahead【.I'm talking abou【t】 /the Iran nu\clear deal which seems to on the verge of collapsing/ after Teh/r【an a\nno【unced】 t】hat it plans to cease some co\mmitments.Yet【 the one behind/ the slow death of the agree】ment is Donald Trump.He walk【ed away from【 it last yea【r, showcasing hi\s dis\dain for diplomacy and what once was a huge multilateral br【eakthrough.Next weekOn Monday, Hungarian Prime Mini】ster Viktor Orba】n will meet US Pres\id【ent Donald T】rump【 at the White 【H/ouse.The meeting will pair t【wo populist/ leaders/ who want 【to restrict migrati/【on, /have vilified jou\rnalis\】】ts and fostered 】tensions with th\e E/uropean Union.On Tue\sday, Rus【si【an Fo】reign Minister 】Sergej 】L\avro【v hosts his US counterpart M\i/ke P【ompeo in Sotchi.Their 】talks will fo【cus /on finding 【a solu\tion to the escalating crisis/ in Venezuela.And on W\ednesday, the candidates f/or the presid\ency of \the E\U Com/miss【i【on wi】l【l 】deb/ate i//n the \European Parliament 】in【 Brus/sels.This debate will be t/he onl/y【 one t】o b】ring together all\ the lead /candid【ates vying to be 】the su【ccess【or of Jean-Claude J\u【ncke/r.Last WordThis time i】t goes to\ /Jean-Claude Juncker./】 T\】he EU Commission President, at/ a press conference, w【ho tal【ked\ ab/out hi【s bigg/est m【【istakes in office."The sec/o/nd mist/ake I made was】 to listen too car/efully/ to t【he Br【itish government, Ca\mer】on, because t【h【e then-Pri】me Minister asked me not to interfere, n\ot to intervene in t/he refe【rendum campaign.It was a mistake not to intervene an\d 】n】ot to interfere becaus\e we would hav\e been the onl】y ones to \destroy 【th】e lies, which \were ci【rculated aroun】d. \I was wr/ong to be silent a【t an important moment."Share th】is art\icleCopy/paste th】e a【rticle \video/ 【embe\/d link below:CopyShareTweet【SharesendSh\areTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areS/ha】reSh\areSendShareShareYou/ mi/ght also like 】 \ / 】 Five stories you may h】ave /\missed /\due to\ coronav【irus 】【 【 】【 】 \ 】 【 EU 【leaders【 m】e\et v【i【a video-conferenc/e - so do our c】orres/ponden】【ts / 【 】 \ / Brexi【t: U/K 'w\【【ill not seek tra//de talks ex\tension&\#039; despite Barnier【 having CO\VID-19【 More aboutEU SummitBre\xitJean-Claude Ju【nckerEnvironmental protection \ 】 【 【Brow\se today【9;s /tags。新型车

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